Travel tips for a worry-free summer

23 July 2013 12:19

Around 14 million Brits are expected to vacation abroad between July and September

Around 14 million Brits are expected to vacation abroad between July and September

Travel association ABTA has released a series of handy tips designed to ensure Brits have a stress-free holiday this year.

Around 14 million Brits are expected to vacation abroad between July and September, according to forecasts from the Association of British Travel Agents (ABTA).

Although many of the best deals have been snapped up already, there are still bargains to be had, with continuing availability in destinations such as Mallorca, Turkey and the Canary Islands.

But before jetting off it's worth taking a look at ABTA's travel tips.

The tips include:

:: Start your holiday planning early by checking your passport is still in date to avoid having to shell out to fast-track your passport renewal at the last minute.

:: Weigh your luggage to ensure you do not exceed your airline's baggage allowance, triggering extra charges.

:: Purchase travel insurance to cover you in the event of lost luggage or medical emergency. Treatment for a broken leg in the US costs around £44,000 - so it's best to be prepared.

:: Inform your bank before you travel overseas to avoid having your holiday purchases show up as suspicious activity, which can lead to your card being blocked.

:: Take care when choosing which souvenirs to bring back from a visit. If you're travelling outside Europe it is often illegal for you to bring back foodstuffs - for a full list of what you can and cannot bring back, visit here.

:: If you're travelling outside of Western Europe, North America or Australasia, make sure you get vaccinated to guard against nasty but preventable diseases.

:: Follow the locals indoors for a leisurely lunch in the shade. The early afternoon heat can be fierce and can easily cause nasty burns or serious dehydration.

:: Try and learn a little of the local tongue. It shouldn't take long to acquire a few words and phrases, and attempts to speak the language are usually warmly appreciated by locals, even if they speak English themselves.

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