Lung cancer numbers set to spike

15 November 2012 09:13

By 2040, just under half of women with lung cancer will be alive at least five years from diagnosis

By 2040, just under half of women with lung cancer will be alive at least five years from diagnosis

The next 30 years will see a tripling in the number of women living with lung cancer in the UK, according to new research. In 2010 there were 26,000 women with the condition, but that number is set to soar to 95,000 by 2040, charity Macmillan Cancer Support said.

Over the same time period, male lung cancer sufferers are set to rise by 8% from 39,000 in 2010 to around 42,000 in 2040, the Macmillan-funded research by King's College London revealed. By 2040, just under half of women with lung cancer will be alive at least five years from diagnosis compared with three-fifths of men, the study found.

The forecasted increase in lung cancer is in large part due to Britain's ageing population, which will make the need for travellers to take out pre-existing medical travel insurance even more acute. In 2011 lung cancer was the second biggest killer for men, responsible for 16,881 deaths, and the fifth biggest killer for women, accounting for 5.3% of deaths, the Office for National Statistics found.

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