Eating fish 'cuts childhood asthma'

20 November 2012 09:26

Infants who ate fish between the ages of six months and one year had a lower risk of developing asthma-like symptoms

Infants who ate fish between the ages of six months and one year had a lower risk of developing asthma-like symptoms

Feeding babies fish between the ages of six months and one year can reduce their risk of developing asthma, according to a new Dutch study. Researchers at the Erasmus Medical Centre in Rotterdam found children who ate fish at this age had a lower risk of suffering from asthma-like symptoms later in life.

The study involved more than 7,000 Dutch children. Results suggested those who first ate fish between the ages of six months and one year had a lower risk of developing asthma symptoms than those introduced to fish before they were six months old, or after their first birthdays. Researchers analysed health records for when the children were around four years old, looking for signs of wheezing or being short of breath.

Those who do go on to develop the condition may find asthma travel insurance can provide peace of mind before going away on holiday. But for parents who want to reduce their child's risk, researchers believe their results show early exposure to certain fatty acids in fish can protect against the development of asthma. According to the researchers, there was a 36% decreased risk of wheezing for the infants who first ate fish between the ages of six months and one year.

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