Smoking ban 'cuts' asthma cases

18 April 2013 08:59

The smoking ban in public places is leading to reduced numbers of asthma sufferers being admitted to hospital, new research has found

The smoking ban in public places is leading to reduced numbers of asthma sufferers being admitted to hospital, new research has found

Hospitals are dealing with nearly 2,000 fewer admissions of asthma patients every year thanks to smoking being banned in public places, according to new research. The study carried out by a team from the University of Bath looked at hospital emergency admission data during the three years following the introduction of the ban in England in July 2007.

The research, made public in the Thorax journal, involved 502,000 admissions relating to people with asthma over the age of 16 between April 1997 and December 2010. It found that the number of admissions was down by 4.9% in the three years after the ban, meaning hospitals were taking in around 1,900 fewer asthma sufferers.

The charity Asthma UK campaigned for the smoking ban before it was brought in and its head of policy and public affairs, Emily Humphreys, said the organisation is delighted to hear how the ban is helping the millions of people in Britain who suffer from the condition. She said people with asthma often complain that breathing in other people's smoke makes them feel worse. Other triggers can also cause asthma sufferers to have problems, so they should be fully prepared with their inhalers and other medication at all times, including on holiday, when an asthma travel insurance policy might also provide peace of mind.

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