Smoking bans cut hospital cases

02 November 2012 09:04

Smoking bans can dramatically cut the amount of hospital cases linked to heart disease and respiratory problems, research has found

Smoking bans can dramatically cut the amount of hospital cases linked to heart disease and respiratory problems, research has found

New studies show that smoking bans have dramatically reduced the level of people taken to hospital for respiratory problems such as asthma and emphysema, as well as heart attacks and stroke, new research shows.

US experts have found that the more stringent the laws, the higher the health benefits when smoking is banned from bars, restaurants and places of work. This could all have a beneficial effect on people who are travelling with pre-existing conditions, particularly related to breathing problems.

The American Heart Association's journal, Circulation, looked at 45 studies covering the US other countries such as New Zealand and Germany. Cases of people taken to hospital for heart attacks were down by 15% on average after smoking ban laws were passed.

Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease saw an even bigger drop in hospital cases - almost a quarter (24%).

British Heart Foundation cardiac nurse Maureen Talbot said: "The risks of passive smoking on our health are well known and this is the reason smoking legislation was introduced throughout the UK in 2007."

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